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WOMENS BASKETBALL RECRUITING CALENDER 2015-2016

Posted by FTL on October 11, 2015 at 12:05 AM Comments comments (0)

NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Recruiting Calendar

August 1, 2015, through July 31, 2016

(See NCAA Division I Bylaw 13.17.3 for Women’s Basketball Calendar Formula)

(a) August 1 through September 8, 2015: Quiet Period 

(b) September 9-29, 2015: Contact Period

• September 25-27: Evaluations permitted at certified nonscholastic women’s basketball events.

(c) September 30, 2015, through February 29, 2016 [except for (1) and (2) below]: Evaluation Period

(1) November 9-12, 2015: Dead Period

(2) December 24-26, 2015: Dead Period

(d) March 1-31, 2016: Contact Period

(e) April 1-14, 2016 [except for (1) and (2) below]: Dead Period

(1) One women’s basketball event certified by the NCAAheld in conjunction with and conducted in the host city of the NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Championship: Evaluation Period

(2) April 8-10, 2016: Quiet Period

(f) April 15-19, 2016: Evaluation Period

*Evaluations at nonscholastic events permissible April 15-17 only.

(g) April 20 through July 5, 2016 [except (1) below]: Quiet Period

(1) April 22-24, 2016: Evaluation Period(for nonscholastic events only)

(h) July 6-12, 2016: Evaluation Period

(i) July 13-22, 2016: Dead Period

(j) July 23-29, 2016: Evaluation Period

(k) July 30-31, 2016: Dead Period

Exceptions: 

1. Evaluations are permitted during the National Junior College Athletic Association championship competition.

2. Evaluations are permissible in the following states only during the time periods listed, provided evaluations outside of the July period are counted toward the 112 recruiting-person days:

Hawaii: March 1 through May 31 and July 8-31

All states (except Hawaii) that play the high school basketball season in the spring: April 8-28 and July 8-31

MENS BASKETBALL RECRUITING CALENDER 2015-2016

Posted by FTL on October 10, 2015 at 11:35 PM Comments comments (0)

NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Recruiting Calendar

August 1, 2015, through July 31, 2016

(See NCAA Division I Bylaw 13.17.2 for Men’s Basketball Calendar Formula)

Note: All live evaluations during recruiting periods shall be limited to regularly scheduled high school, preparatory school and two-year college contests/tournaments, practices and regular scholastic activities involving prospective student-athletes enrolled only at the institution where the regular scholastic activities occur. During the April evaluation period, evaluations shall be limited to nonscholastic events that are certified per NCAA Bylaw 13.18.

(a) August 1 through September 8, 2015: Quiet Period

(b) September 9 through November 8, 2015: Recruiting Period

Dead Period Recruiting Period Dead Period Evaluation Period (for certified events only) Quiet Period Evaluation Period (for certified events only) Quiet Period Evaluation Period (for combine only) Dead Period

 

 

(c) November 9-12, 2015: Dead Period

(d) November 13, 2015 through March 30, 2016 [except for (1) below]: Recruiting Period

(1) December 24-26, 2015: Dead Period

(e) March 31 through April 7 (noon), 2016: Dead Period

(f) April 7 (noon)-20, 2016 [except for (1) and (2) below]: Recruiting Period

(1) April 11-14, 2016: Dead Period

(2) April 15-17, 2016 : Evaluation Period (for certified events only)

(g) April 21, 2016: Quiet Period

(h) April 22-24, 2016: Evaluation Period (for certified events only)

(i) April 25 through July 5, 2016 [except for (1) and (2) below]: Quiet Period

(1) NBA Draft Combine: Evaluation Period (for combine only)

(2) May 19-27, 2016: Dead Period

(j) July 6-31, 2016 [except for (1) through (3) below]: Dead Period

(1) July 6 (5 p.m.) – 10 (5 p.m.): Evaluation Period

(2) July 13 (5 p.m.) – 17 (5 p.m.): Evaluation Period

(3) July 20 (5 p.m.) – 24 (5 p.m.): Evaluation Period 

NCAA RECRUITING INFORMATION

Posted by FTL on October 10, 2015 at 11:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Recruiting Calendars

NCAA member schools have adopted rules to create an equitable recruiting environment that promotes student-athlete well-being. The rules define who may be involved in the recruiting process, when recruiting may occur and the conditions under which recruiting may be conducted. Recruiting rules seek, as much as possible, to control intrusions into the lives of student-athletes.

 

The NCAA defines recruiting as “any solicitation of prospective student-athletes or their parents by an institutional staff member or by a representative of the institution’s athletics interests for the purpose of securing a prospective student-athlete’s enrollment and ultimate participation in the institution’s intercollegiate athletics program.”

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a contact?

A contact occurs any time a college coach says more than hello during a face-to-face contact with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.

 

What is a contact period?

During a contact period a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.

 

What is an evaluation period?

During an evaluation period a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.

 

What is a quiet period?

During a quiet period, a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college’s campus. A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

 

What is a dead period?

During a dead period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.

 

What is the difference between an official visit and an unofficial visit?

Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by college-bound student-athletes or their parents are unofficial visits.

 

During an official visit the college can pay for transportation to and from the college for the prospect, lodging and three meals per day for both the prospect and the parent or guardian, as well as reasonable entertainment expenses including three tickets to a home sports event.

 

The only expenses a college-bound student-athlete may receive from a college during an unofficial visit are three tickets to a home sports event.

 

What is a National Letter of Intent?

A National Letter of Intent is signed by a college-bound student-athlete when the student-athlete agrees to attend a Division I or II college or university for one academic year. Participating institutions agree to provide financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete as long as the student-athlete is admitted to the school and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules. Other forms of financial aid do not guarantee the student-athlete financial aid.

 

The National Letter of Intent is voluntary and not required for a student-athlete to receive financial aid or participate in sports.

 

Signing an National Letter of Intent ends the recruiting process since participating schools are prohibited from recruiting student-athletes who have already signed letters with other participating schools.

 

A student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent may request a release from his or her contract with the school. If a student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent with one school but attends a different school, he or she will lose one full year of eligibility and must complete a full academic year at their new school before being eligible to compete.

 

What are recruiting calendars?

Recruiting calendars help promote the well-being prospective student-athletes and coaches and ensure competitive equity by defining certain time periods in which recruiting may or may not occur in a particular sport.

ADIDAS UPRISING

Posted by FTL on June 9, 2014 at 12:45 AM Comments comments (0)


adidas Announces Dates for 2014 adidas Uprising Grassroots Basketball Programs

adidas today announced its 2014 adidas Uprising grassroots basketball schedule which includes a four-tournament series, an elite skills camp and adidas Nations all designed to showcase the best young basketball players in the country.

 

The tournament series includes three qualifying events and culminates with the top 32 teams competing in championship play at adidas Super 64, July 23-27 in Las Vegas. Qualifying tournaments include Dallas, April 25-27, Indianapolis, May 16-18 and Orlando, May 23-26. Teams competing in these qualifying events are ranked based on win/loss records and receive invitations to compete in the final based on those rankings. Also new this year is adidas Unrivaled, a skills camp offering 100 of the top high school prospects in the country the opportunity to hone their skills with college coaches and adidas NBA athletes July 9-13 in Chicago.

 

"Providing the next generation of elite basketball athletes the opportunity to improve their game and develop skills for the next level is the mission of our programs," said Jeff Robbins, manager of grassroots basketball for adidas. "The format of adidas Uprising and the introduction of adidas Unrivaled allow us to strengthen and develop the game of basketball at all levels."

 

adidas Nations will continue as the premier international grassroots program within adidas Uprising. adidas Nations brings together the top high school basketball players from the U.S., Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and Latin America to train and compete. The adidas Nations Global final event will be held July 31-Aug 4 in Los Angeles.

 

Former adidas Grassroots participants include NBA athletes Dwight Howard, Derrick Rose, Eric Gordon, Jrue Holiday, Joakim Noah and Serge Ibaka.

USA Basketball looks to put its stamp on youth basketball

Posted by FTL on June 13, 2013 at 12:25 AM Comments comments (0)

http://collegebasketballtalk.nbcsports.com/2013/06/08/usa-basketball-looks-to-put-its-stamp-on-youth-sports/

 

There are a lot of skill development camps for young basketball players. It can be tough to know which ones are legit, and which ones are just a good way to make a quick buck. USA Basketball, the governing body that assembles the national team and all of the youth versions of it, would like to get a hand in regulating the general quality of instruction. The organization is establishing a youth division, according to the Colorado Springs Gazette.

 

“Basketball is very popular in this country, which is good,” USA Basketball executive director Jim Tooley (pictured, with Andre Iguodala) told the newspaper. “It can also be a challenge because there are so many camps. We want to provide some guidance.”

 

Right now, the youth division of USA Basketball exists on paper only. Tooley expects to spend some time over the next year or so figuring out how to structure the new division, including hiring a director and deciding how many employees the new division will need.

 

The youth division’s primary goal will be to establish acceptable standards and practices for the profusion of youth basketball camps across the United States, primarily those focused on advanced skills and officiating.

 

Tooley said the many camps focused on fundamentals would not be affected.

 

Accreditation will help parents make the right choices, he added, and let them know they are sending their child to a safe environment.

 

“If the coaches are certified, it adds a comfort level,” he said. “If they are not, hopefully parents weigh that in their decision.”

 

It will be interesting to see what becomes of this idea. Other nations exert a fair amount of control over their national basketball development pipelines, while the U.S. relies on a hodgepodge of high school programs, summer camps, AAU super teams and prep schools. Those of us familiar with the NCAA may be rightfully wary of any sort of governing body that proclaims to guide and protect the sport and its players, but perhaps a little scrutiny and reinvention could improve the whole youth skills development process.

 

Eric Angevine is the editor of Storming the Floor. He tweets @stfhoops.


EYBL may change travel basketball

Posted by FTL on April 11, 2010 at 10:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Nike steps in to organize and provide championship for travel teams

Originally Published: April 8, 2010

EYBL may change travel basketballNike steps in to organize and provide championship for travel

By Christopher Lawlor

ESPN.com

 

Leave it to Nike to revolutionize the travel basketball circuit.

After bouncing around a simple concept for the past five years, the company with the trademark swoosh will debut the Elite Youth Basketball League this weekend at the Boo Williams Invitational in Hampton, Va.

"We were looking to bring structure to the travel game," said Jeff Rogers, the league commissioner and director of Nike elite grassroots basketball. "We have had a tremendous response without having played a game. We hope this changes the way things are done."

"It's a wonderful league. It's innovative and brings structure to the travel scene. This might serve as a future model for how things may be done. We're anxious to get started."

-- Albany City Rocks director Jim Hart

 

The EYBL is a first-ever league featuring 42 high-level, U17 grassroots teams playing for a championship. It culminates in July at the Nike Peach Jam in North Augusta, Ga.

The concept is simple. The teams, divided into four divisions, will play a predetermined schedule during three weekends this spring -- in Hampton (Friday through Sunday), Houston (May 14-16) and Los Angeles (May 29-31). After the third event, the top five teams in each of the four divisions will automatically advance to the Peach Jam bracket, with four at-large teams added to round out the 24-team championship tournament. Teams that receive an automatic bid are guaranteed spots for 2011.

Yes, that means 18 teams won't make it and could be dropped from the EYBL next year.

"This will unify and organize the game at the highest level," said Paul Biancardi, ESPN's national basketball recruiting director. "It blends the best of what Nike does on the grassroots level."

Rogers believes the EYBL will promote ownership within the constituency during the course of three months.

"We'll find out a few things about these teams," Rogers said. "Teams will be scouting their next opponents, booking travel, playing each possession and investing their time.

"Unlike some tournaments where teams win their first three games by 30 or 40 points and lose interest, or lose three games and go home, there won't be any championships awarded on the first three weekends of league play.

"Kids like organized competition but are used to playing for a championship every weekend. That devalues the word championship. When you do compete for the EYBL championships you'll have earned it over the course of two or three months," he said.

The action tips off Friday evening at the state-of-the-art Boo Williams Sportsplex in Hampton with 20 games on seven courts. The opening weekend includes 85 EYBL games.

"It's a wonderful league," said Jim Hart, president of the Nike-sponsored Albany City Rocks. "It's innovative and brings structure to the travel scene. This might serve as a future model for how things may be done. We're anxious to get started."

Several clubs have already inquired about joining, but Rogers will stick with 42 teams who have been "loyal to Nike over the years and shown success."

Here's a breakdown of the four 17-and-under divisions (listed alphabetically).

A: Albany (N.Y.) City Rocks, Baltimore Elite, Georgia Blazers, Howard Pulley (Minn.), Louisiana Select, Mean Streets (Chicago), Team Final (N.J.), Tennessee Travelers; Wisconsin Playground Soldiers, YOMCA (Memphis, Tenn.)

B: All-Ohio Red, Arizona Stars, Each 1 Teach 1 (Fla.), King James Shooting Stars (Ohio), South Carolina Ravens, Seattle Rotary, Spiece Indy Heat (Ind.), Team Takeover (Md.), Team Texas, The Family (Detroit).

C: Alabama Challenge, Athletes First (Okla.), Birmingham (Ala.) Storm, Boo Williams (Va.), California Supreme, Houston (Texas) Hoops, ICP Portland (Ore.), Jackson (Miss.) Tigers, Oakland (Calif.) Soldiers, St. Louis Eagles.

D: Arkansas Wings, BABC (Boston), Charlotte (N.C.) Royals, D-One Sports (N.C.), Friends of Hoop (Seattle), Georgia Stars, Mac Irvin Fire (Chicago), Metro Hawks (N.Y.), New Jersey Playaz, New York Gauchos, Southern Kings (Ga.), Team Florida.

Playing by the rules

Structure means rules, set forth by Rogers. Keep the following in mind as the opening weekend approaches.

• Rosters, composed of 15 players, must be locked before the start of league play. Teams cannot share players but can change out three players during the first two tournaments. Up to three players from outside a team's home state will be permitted.

• Games will feature NCAA rules, including the college 3-point line, 16-minute halves, 35-second shot clock, a bonus after 10 fouls, player disqualification after five personal fouls and three-man officiating crews.

• Appearance counts. Players and coaches will wear provided game gear, meaning coaches will wear polo shirts and slacks.

• Tiebreakers in the standings are head-to-head competition, 3-way point system and conference record.

• There's no leeway on fifth-year players or reclassified seniors; they are out. Players must have at least one year of high school eligibility remaining.

• Traveling will be enforced, in other words: be on time. If a team misses a game because of a flight delay, they will forfeit it. Same goes for being late for the scheduled tip-off. No games will be made up, period.

"Every possession, every game, every weekend will count; it's a compounding effect," Biancardi said. "It teaches players accountability, and team and winning become important."

EYBL's got talent

The EYBL will feature 52 players in the ESPNU Super 60 rankings.

Biancardi, who coached at Wright State, Saint Louis, Ohio State and Boston College, believes the individual talent is off the charts. Colleges will be able to follow a player's team progression, capped by Peach Jam, which falls during a live viewing period in July.

"Each weekend the EYBL is played, that's where all the superior talent will be of any event across the country," Biancardi said. "You'll be able to gauge the progress of players, teams; it gives you something to talk about because it's a long-term process. You'll see how teams respond. Teams will be playing for their future in the EYBL."


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